Scenic routes from A to Z
A
  • A
  • B
  • C
  • D
  • E
  • F
  • G
  • H
  • I
  • J
  • K
  • L
  • M
  • N
  • O
  • P
  • Q
  • R
  • T
  • U
  • V
  • W
  • X
  • Y
  • Z
VIA REGIA – Cultural Route – THE cultural route through Europe

VIA REGIA – Cultural Route – THE cultural route through Europe

For over 2,000 years, the VIA REGIA has been the oldest and longest road link between Eastern and Western Europe. At around 4500 km and starting in Kiev, it passes through eight countries on its way to Santiago de Compostela. The German section of the route runs for approximately 600 km from the Rhine river through Frankfurt , Fulda, Eisenach, Naumburg, Leipzig and Bautzen to Görlitz.

Kings were not the only ones attracted to this medieval trade route: traders carried their wares along it, the military used it and in the medieval period, pilgrims followed it across the Western World to the Spanish pilgrimage site of Santiago de Compostela.

The trade route

The route was of great economic significance to cross-regional trade and the exchange of goods. Flanders cloth was transported from the West and wood, furs, wax and honey from the East, whilst the central regions transported dyer's woad (a plant used for dye) from the Thuringian Basin and mining products from Upper Saxony. The route also linked the two great trade fair cities of Frankfurt am Main and Leipzig in Saxony.

A military route

The route was also used by armies, and so large battles also took place around it, for example two decisive battles during the Thirty Years' War in 1631 and 1642 at Breitenfeld near Leipzig. The death march from Adlerwerke concentration camp in Frankfurt to Buchenwald concentration camp also travelled along the VIA REGIA in March 1945.

Movement, meetings and meditation

Numerous pilgrims taking part in the Aachen Pilgrimage also used the highway as a pilgrimage route. The VIA REGIA, an exquisite and fascinating treasure trove of European cultural history, remains a route of cultural dialogue and communication to this day. Since the fall of the Berlin Wall in the autumn of 1989, the German part of the route has amounted to about 600 km and now as then, the cities located either side of it have blossomed into a breathtaking tourist belt that serves as a treasure trove of Europe's past.

Via Regia

Length: approximately 4500 km

Theme: culture and encounters

Highlights:
Bautzen: castle, ecclesiastical buildings
Eisenach: Luther city, Wartburg Castle
Erfurt: Augustinian abbey, Merchant's Bridge (Krämerbrücke)
Frankfurt: Römer town hall, skyline, Main river
Fulda: cathedral, palace, abbey
Görlitz: Europe city
Leipzig: trade fair city, Battle of Leipzig memorial
Naumburg: cathedral, museums

www.via-regia.org

Events

What was only a ruin after World War II rose anew between 1993 and 2005 thanks to donations from all over the world. Today, as in old times, it represents the perfection of church construction according to Luther’s ideals. After its renewed consecration the Church of Our Lady in Dresden (Frauenkirche) once more took its place as top class musical venue. Naturally, music events taking place throughout the anniversary year 2017 will focus on the Reformation as well. Therefore, the Frauenkirche has invited prominent artists and even asked the composer Jörg Herchet to write a new composition basing on a famous hymn of thanksgiving by Martin Luther that will première on 24 June.

Further information: www.frauenkirche-dresden.de/en/music/

Upcoming dates:

01.01.2017 - 27.12.2017

Venue

Frauenkirche Dresden
Neumarkt
01067 Dresden
Fon: +49 (0) 351 65606701
Fax: +49 (0) 351 65606108
fuehrungen@frauenkirche-dresden.de
www.frauenkirche-dresden.de

Organiser

Stiftung Frauenkirche
Fon: +49 (0) 351 65606100
Fax: +49 (0) 351 65606108
fuehrungen@frauenkirche-dresden.de

All information on prices, dates and opening times are subject to change without notice.

In remembrance of the end of the 2nd World War, Yadegar Asisi depictsDresden in ruins after the bombing attacks in February 1945. DRESDEN 1945 takes you on a journey through time back to the Elbe metropolis in the immediate aftermath of the bombing raids in 1945. The view from the Town Hall tower reveals the ruins of the destroyed city, from which columns of smoke are seen rising. The project broaches the issues of tragedy and hope in Europe. It does not merely show the tragedy of Dresden, but draws attention to the interactions of European war-torn history. By 1945, not only had a large number of European cities been destroyed, such as Rotterdam, Coventry, Stalingrad and Warsaw, but also numerous German cities.

Further information: www.asisi.de/en

Upcoming dates:

14.01.2017 - 11.06.2017

Venue

Panometer Dresden
Gasanstaltstr. 8b
01237 Dresden
Fon: +49 (0) 341 3555340
Fax: +49 (0) 341 35553450
service@asisi.de
www.asisi.de

Organiser

asisi Panometer Dresden
Richard-Lehmann-Straße 114
04275 Leipzig
Fon: +49 (0) 351 8603940
Fax: +49 (0) 351 8603949
service@asisi.de
http://www.asisi.de

All information on prices, dates and opening times are subject to change without notice.

During the 19th century the “land where the lemon trees do bloom” attracted numerous travellers from Northern Europe. In Germany, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe fuelled the collective urge to travel south through his “Italian Journey”, which was first published in 1816/17. About fifteen years before, when he wrote enthusiastically about a “pure blue Italian sky“ over Dresden, Heinrich von Kleist expressed a deep yearning for the bright light of a country that was fascinating not only on account of its antique and Christian sites and its wealth of Renaissance art, but also thanks to its wild and elegiac landscapes.

Further information: www.skd.museum/en/special-exhibitions/beneath-italian-skies

Upcoming dates:

10.02.2017 - 28.05.2017

Venue

Albertinum (Galerie Neue Meister und Skulpturensammlung) - Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden
Tzschirnerplatz 2
01067 Dresden
Fon: +49 (0) 351 49142000
Fax: +49 (0) 351 49142001
besucherservice@skd.museum.de
www.skd.museum

Organiser

Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden
Taschenberg 2
01067 Dresden
Fon: +49 (0) 351 49142000
Fax: +49 (0) 351 49142001
besucherservice@skd.museum
http://www.skd.museum/

All information on prices, dates and opening times are subject to change without notice.

Events

Event search
other search criteria
Reset all