Leisure parks – you'll be amazed.

Germany's leisure parks and interactive exhibitions combine fun with action, the fascinating with the curious, and the down-to-earth with the exotic. Some are traditional, others futuristic – all are designed with a love of detail and special attention to visitors' individual needs.
Visitor with audio guide viewing an exhibit at Arche Nebra
Arche Nebra National Park in Wangen

Arche Nebra National Park in Wangen near Nebra takes visitors on an exciting journey 3,600 years back in time to recount the awe-inspiring story of the mysterious 'Nebra Sky Disk'. The entire complex is barrier-free; an audio guide is available for partially sighted visitors.

Visitors in an interior space at Babelsberg Film Park
Babelsberg Film Park

Lying just outside Berlin, Babelsberg Film Park employs a grandiose mixture of entertainment, action, and authentic film and TV to provide insights into the exciting work of movie professionals. An audio guide provides extensive commentary that includes authentic insider stories.

Father with child watching the giant tortoises at Rostock Zoo
Darwineum in Rostock

Nestling in the sweeping surroundings of the city's zoo, the Darwineum in Rostock is one of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern's top interactive attractions. The spacious centre enables visitors to explore evolution and offers people with sensorial impairments or limited mobility an unforgettable experience.

The Adventureland African Queen with raftsmen on a lake
Europa-Park in Rust

The Europa-Park in Rust is Germany's largest leisure park, recreating many of the world's countries with typical restaurants, cafés and shows. Most attractions and shows are accessible; however the rides (except the EP Express) are not suitable for wheelchairs. The Europa-Park's hotels rank among Germany's Category A-rated accessible accommodation establishments, restaurants and cafés.

The Christian garden with shrubs and letter monuments at Berlin's Gardens of the World.
'Gardens of the World' at Berlin-Marzahn

The 'Gardens of the World' at the centre of Berlin-Marzahn's concrete buildings are perfect for a green excursion. The park has been awarded the 'Accessible Berlin' sign; the Gardens are all accessible with flat terrain and Wheelchair users enter free of charge.

Visitor in a wheelchair at the Grottoneum in Saalfeld
Grottoneum in Saalfeld

Using interactive stations, the Grottoneum discovery museum in Saalfeld gives visitors the opportunity to touch, taste and trace the 440-million-year history of stalactites and stalagmites. The facility is fully accessible with flat floors throughout. Height differences are bridged using ramps and platform lifts.

'Africa Enclosure' at Hagenbeck Zoo with flamingos, a zebra and a lioness.
Hagenbeck Zoo

Hagenbeck Zoo in Hamburg has amazed visitors for over a century with its botanical diversity, historically preserved panoramas and impressive ice lake. More than 1,850 animals from all the continents are waiting to be discovered! All paths and facilities are suitable for wheelchairs and walking frames.

Giraffe watching a boat carrying visitors on the lake outside the Adventure Zoo in Hannover
Hannover Adventure Zoo

Hannover's Adventure Zoo transports visitors to another world; a particular highlight being the journey down the Zambezi river. The boats glide silently over the water, passing giraffes, lions, zebras, and — last but not least — hippos. Entrance to the boats is barrier-free and suitable for standard wheelchairs.

Barrier-free control

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