• Up close with a herd of Heidschnucke sheep
    Up close with a herd of Heidschnucke sheep ©Lüneburger Heide GmbH
  • Enjoying the local wine at a vintner's tavern in Baden-Württemberg
    Enjoying the local wine at a vintner's tavern in Baden-Württemberg ©TMBW
  • Lübeck marzipan
    Lübeck marzipan ©imago
  • Halloren Kugeln from Saxony-Anhalt
    Halloren Kugeln from Saxony-Anhalt ©imago/Star-Media
  • Eiergrog on Heligoland
    Eiergrog on Heligoland ©TASH/ I. Wandmacher
  • Enjoying East Frisian tea at the harbour
    Enjoying East Frisian tea at the harbour ©Ostfriesland Tourismus GmbH
  • Markthalle Neun
    Markthalle Neun ©visitBerlin/Philip Koschel
  • Fresh asparagus for sale in the Münsterland region
    Fresh asparagus for sale in the Münsterland region ©Oliver Franke, Tourismus NRW e.V.
  • Pretzels from Baden-Württemberg
    Pretzels from Baden-Württemberg ©pixabay
  • Dresden's Christstollen
    Dresden's Christstollen ©Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen (Sylvio Dittrich)
  • Apfelwein from Hessen
    Apfelwein from Hessen ©Tourismus+Congress GmbH Frankfurt am Main
  • Fine wines at the vineyard
    Fine wines at the vineyard ©Rheinland-Pfalz Tourismus GmbH
  • Green sauce
    Green sauce ©Tourismus+Congress GmbH Frankfurt am Main
  • Bavarian beer
    Bavarian beer ©BAYERN TOURISMUS Marketing GmbH

A taste of Germany.

Beer and bratwurst are of course an integral part of the country's festivals and public holidays. But they're just one small part of all the pleasures on offer. Take yourself on a culinary tour of discovery through Germany. You'll be amazed at the diversity of delicacies and taste experiences you'll encounter.

Schleswig-Holstein has over 120 varieties of cheese made from cow's, sheep's and goat's milk. Produced to new as well as traditional recipes, most of them are made by hand in artisan dairies. The Schleswig-Holstein Cheese Route runs right through the region for more than 500 kilometres, linking all the producers and events involved with this gourmet dairy produce. It also takes in several places of interest and of course the wonderful Schleswig-Holstein scenery.

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Coffee roasting is something of a tradition on the Weser river. The first coffee shop in the German-speaking countries opened here in the far north of the country in 1673. Since then, coffee has become a daily essential for practically everyone. And in Germany at least, there's every chance that your beans or ground coffee will have come through Bremen . Every other cup of coffee drunk between the North Sea and the Alps has its origins in Bremen. Decaff as well as regular, because thanks to the local coffee merchant Ludwig Roselius, the decaffeination process was invented on the banks of the Weser.

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Jägermeister is a herbal liqueur that is made and bottled in the Lower Saxony town of Wolfenbüttel, where the firm also has its headquarters. The recipe dates back to 1934 and exports began in the seventies. Today Jägermeister is available in over 80 countries worldwide. The key ingredient (the special mixture of 56 different herbs) is produced exclusively in the Wolfenbüttel factory, which can be visited on a guided tour.

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Lüneburg Heath is one of Europe's most famous regions and its food and drink are equally celebrated. As well as potatoes, asparagus and honey, the tender, venison-like meat of the Heidschnucke heathland sheep is particularly valued by gourmets. The sheep are a very old breed specially adapted to the moorland conditions of the heath. Their meat enjoys Protected Designation of Origin status in Europe.

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The quality marque Typisch Harz designates original Harz products and services. It stands for regional identity, quality and sustainability. The Harz area is particularly well known for its cheese, a small curd variety that is rich in protein, low in fat and extremely healthy.

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This fermented cow's milk cheese has a long tradition in Hessen and is particularly popular in the south of the region. It gets its name (literally 'hand cheese') from its original early 19th century production method of hand kneading and shaping. Handkäs is traditionally served with 'music', a marinade of onion, vinegar, oil and caraway seeds, and brown or rye bread and butter.

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In 1804 in Halle , a small patisserie and gingerbread bakery opened that went on to become the Halloren factory, the oldest chocolate factory in Germany that is still in operation. Its most famous product, however, is relatively young. The Halloren Kugeln chocolate balls have only been produced since 1952. Their round shape is reminiscent of the silver buttons of the jackets of the saltworkers, who were known as the Halloren. But there is no truth in the old story that the chocolates used to be eaten with salt. To learn more about production of the chocolates, visit the company's chocolate museum.

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The first frost of winter is something that the people of Lower Saxony actually look forward to. Because between the Elbe and Ems rivers, November to March is curly kale season. Kale and pinkel (a sausage made of bacon, pork belly, onions and herbs) is a regional dish of the north, and the leafy greens themselves are often enjoyed on 'kale tours' taken by groups of friends and colleagues.

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