Dresden

Although the Lutheran Church of Our Lady is today an internationally recognised symbol of Protestant architecture as well as a famous Dresden landmark, the Reformation initially attracted very few supporters in the city.

Luther visited Dresden in 1516 and 1518, one year after nailing his theses to the church door in Wittenberg. He was sent by his order to the Augustinian monastery, where he received a warm welcome but little sympathy for his ideas. This rejection was supported by the resident Dresden duke, who had every Lutheran Bible on his territory confiscated in 1523. Luther's followers subsequently did take the Reformation to Dresden, as commemorated by the Church of Our Lady, the Luther statue outside the church and the Martin Luther Church in Dresden's Neustadt district.

Highlights

Dresden, 'Florence of the Elbe', is an artwork in itself. Beautiful buildings such as the baroque Zwinger Palace, magnificent treasures and world-class museums make this city in the Free State of Saxony a hotspot for cultural tourists from all over the world. Nature lovers can explore the Saxon Switzerland National Park with its bizarre rock formations and the gentle vineyards of the Elbe valley.

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Zwinger Palace

O Chateau de Versailles de Dresden

O Zwinger Palace é um dos melhores exemplos da arquitetura barroca tardia na Alemanha. Construído entre 1710 e 1728 pelo arquiteto Pöppelmann, o Palácio Zwinger foi usado para grandes festas e torneios. Hoje, o complexo barroco de pavilhões, galerias e pátios interiores é a casa de grandes museus e obras. A Madonna Sistina de Rafael você encontrará lá. O acervo de Porcelana tambem é belíssimo. O Arsenal também é muito interessante se você curte trajes e armas. Se você não quiser entrar em nenhum museu, vá pelo menos para andar pelos jardins e admirar o "Kronentor", que é o portão com a coroa.

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martinha@viajoteca.com

Asisi Panometer

Deesden : 1945

Setenta anos depois do bombardeio de Dresden, na Segunda Guerra Mundial, um panorama de 360 ​​graus que mostra a cidade destruída foi revelado na cidade. O artista Yadegar Asisi criou uma imagem circular de 100 metros de largura e 30 metros de altura que mostra Dresden após os devastadores ataques aéreos dos aliados. Entre 13-15 fevereiro de 1945, apenas alguns meses antes do fim da guerra, os bombardeiros britânicos e norte-americanos destruíram mais de 90 por cento do centro histórico da cidade, matando cerca de 25.000 pessoas. Mais de 3.900 toneladas de bombas de alto poder explosivo e dispositivos incendiários dizimaram marcos importantes do barroco em uma cidade que é considerada "a Florença do Elba". O panorama, Dresden: 1945, fica aberto de 24 de Janeiro à 31 de maio de 2015, no gasômetro Panometer. http://www.asisi.de/en/panoramas/dresden-1945/photo-gallery.html

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martinha@viajoteca.com

Frauenkirche - Church of Our Lady

A Lady de Dresden

A Igreja da Nossa Senhora de Dresden é um espetáculo de linda. É a igreja que vai te impactar no primeiro minuto que você entrar e ver uma igreja branca, super luminada. Se há um lugar cuja história pode mover-lo às lágrimas, será n'a Igreja de Nossa Senhora. Durante a Segunda Guerra Mundial, a igreja foi bombardeada e ficou em escombros até 1994, quando um programa de restauração foi iniciado. Hoje, é um lembrete dos dias antes da guerra e um dos lugares que você vai ter uma história imparcial sobre a Segunda Guerra Mundial.

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martinha@viajoteca.com

Stollenfest

The Christmas Stollen (fruit cake) of Dresden is famous all over the world. It was already baked in the 15th century, and in the 18th century the Stollenfest was born. In 1730 August II the Strong ordered the Bakers’ Guild of Dresden to make a giant 1.7-ton Stollen. In 2013 the giant Stollen was 4 tons heavy and was paraded in the traditional way on the back of a horse-drawn carriage through the city. At Striezelmarkt, one of the most beautiful Christmas markets of Germany, the giant Stollen gets sold for a good cause. This year it took 2,5h hours and the whole Stollen was gone. For sure you can also buy smaller Stollen at Striezelmarkt and everywhere else in Dresden during Christmas time. The Stollenfest always takes place on the Saturday before the second Sunday in Advent. A fun event to get into Christmas mood!

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yvonne@justtravelous.com

Eierschecke

Eierschecke: A Sweet Saxon Dessert

Eierschecke is the Saxon interpretation of cheesecake. It often comes with an apple topping. In the 14th century “Schecke” was a piece of clothing that men would wear, much like a long robe with a tight waist. The waist would divide the robe into three pieces (top, waist, lower skirt) much like the dessert, which consist of three different layers. You can get them at all the bakeries so make sure you plan for a coffee & cake break while visiting!

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lea@reiseblogger-kollektiv.com

Erich Kästner Museum

Exploring the Life of the German Author Erich Kästner

Remember Lindsay Lohan in the role of a young girl finding out about her twin sister in the 1996 movie “The Parent Trap”? One of the many movies that's based on one of Erich Kästner's great writing. The author was born in Königsbrücker Straße, not far from the place that now houses the Erich Kästner mirco museum – not your everyday museum. Much like in a traversable treasure chest you can walk through the museum and open draws that will reveal bits and pieces of Kästner's life and work. The deeper you dig through photos, letters, old theater programs and books, the more you'll want to read!

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lea@reiseblogger-kollektiv.com

Dresden Hygiene Museum

Explore The Human Body in Dresden

If you're into biology and like watching documentaries on the human body this is a must see when you're in town! The Hygiene Museum Dresden is one big adventure to explore the human body. The permanent exhibition displays a large part of the museum's extensive collection, which is made accessible to all ages with the help of media units and interactive elements throughout the museum. The museum itself dates back to the early 20th century. It was first opened by a local businessman and manufacturer of hygiene products. The museum was also the first museum to host the International Hygiene Exhibition in 1911. Since 1930, the best known object is probably the “Transparent Man” - a life-size human skeleton with artificial internal organs as well as arteries and venes. The “Gläserne Mensch” (literally: glass human) has also become a symbol for the museum itself.

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lea@reiseblogger-kollektiv.com

Frauenkirche - Church of Our Lady

Frauenkirche - Church of Our Lady

The Frauenkirche is actually a relatively new sight – at least for for Dresden locals. The Lutheran church vanished from Dresden's skyline in the devastating bombings of the city during World War II in 1945. The ruins where then kept as an anti-war memorial and restoration didn't starting until after the reunification of Germany in 1989. 60 years later in 2005 it was finally reopened. The costly reconstruction of the dome was financed with donations. One very large donation came from Günter Blobel, an American with German roots. He had seen the Church of Our Lady just before the city was bombed and took an interested in restoring the city. In 1999 Blobel won the Nobel Prize for medicine and donated the entire amount of his winning money towards the rebuilding of the Frauenkirche and other restoration works in Dresden. If look at the church from the outside you'll spot some dark stones in the walls – those are the original stones.

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lea@reiseblogger-kollektiv.com