• Fine wines at the vineyard
    Fine wines at the vineyard ©Rheinland-Pfalz Tourismus GmbH
  • Enjoying East Frisian tea at the harbour
    Enjoying East Frisian tea at the harbour ©Ostfriesland Tourismus GmbH
  • Pretzels from Baden-Württemberg
    Pretzels from Baden-Württemberg ©pixabay
  • Eiergrog on Heligoland
    Eiergrog on Heligoland ©TASH/ I. Wandmacher
  • Markthalle Neun
    Markthalle Neun ©visitBerlin/Philip Koschel
  • Fresh asparagus for sale in the Münsterland region
    Fresh asparagus for sale in the Münsterland region ©Oliver Franke, Tourismus NRW e.V.
  • Dresden's Christstollen
    Dresden's Christstollen ©Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen (Sylvio Dittrich)
  • Green sauce
    Green sauce ©Tourismus+Congress GmbH Frankfurt am Main
  • Lübeck marzipan
    Lübeck marzipan ©imago
  • Halloren Kugeln from Saxony-Anhalt
    Halloren Kugeln from Saxony-Anhalt ©imago/Star-Media
  • Bavarian beer
    Bavarian beer ©BAYERN TOURISMUS Marketing GmbH
  • Enjoying the local wine at a vintner's tavern in Baden-Württemberg
    Enjoying the local wine at a vintner's tavern in Baden-Württemberg ©TMBW
  • Apfelwein from Hessen
    Apfelwein from Hessen ©Tourismus+Congress GmbH Frankfurt am Main
  • Up close with a herd of Heidschnucke sheep
    Up close with a herd of Heidschnucke sheep ©Lüneburger Heide GmbH

A taste of Germany.

Beer and bratwurst are of course an integral part of the country's festivals and public holidays. But they're just one small part of all the pleasures on offer. Take yourself on a culinary tour of discovery through Germany. You'll be amazed at the diversity of delicacies and taste experiences you'll encounter.

The Altes Land region is with good reason described as Germany's largest orchard. Just outside the city of Hamburg , more than 10,000 hectares are given over to fruit growing, predominantly apples, but also cherries, pears, plums and berries, all of which find their way into Germany's greengrocers. In Lower Saxony, this local fruit is mainly used in delicious cakes and other sweet treats, which can be sampled in numerous farmshop cafés out in the countryside.

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A highlight of the Erzgebirge Christmas is the traditional Christmas Eve feast known as the neunerlei . It comprises nine courses symbolising memories, hopes and what you've achieved during the year. Dishes might consist of lentils or peas, bratwurst with sauerkraut , herring or pieces of fish with apple salad, potato salad with sausages, groats, millet porridge or rosehip soup, roast pork with dumplings, bread and salt, prunes and a bread and milk mixture prepared with chopped nuts.

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There are competing theories as to how maultaschen , or 'Swabian ravioli', first came about. One theory holds that the Cistercian monks of Maulbronn Monastery (hence the name maultaschen ) were loath to go without meat during Lent. So they concealed the forbidden food from the sight of the Lord by enclosing it in a pasta dough. Hence also the other name for the dish – herrgottsb'scheisserle , or 'Fool the Lord'.

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Nowhere is Schleswig-Holstein’s sweet tooth more apparent than in Lübeck, home of the world-famous Lübeck marzipan. Once the preserve of the wealthy and the powerful, the marzipan is still largely produced by hand. At the Niederegger Marzipan Salon in Lübeck you can learn about the long journey that this almond confectionery has made over the centuries, from its origins in the East to a Hanseatic town in northern Germany. Because marzipan wasn't invented in Lübeck. Just perfected.

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An old-fashioned market with a modern twist, Markthalle Neun in Berlin 's Kreuzberg is over 100 years old. Today, nestled among the area's trendy bars, it offers alternative food, drink and shopping. The weekly market takes place on Friday and Saturday, while 'Streetfood Thursday', like the city's Naschmarkt sweet market, offers high-quality 'slow food' and delicacies made from regional and seasonal produce.

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The Bahlsen company in Hannover has been producing the famous Leibniz biscuit for over 120 years. Named after the renowned polymath Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, this extraordinary biscuit was even awarded a gold medal at the World's Fair in Chicago. So revered is it that in 2013 the brass emblem of the biscuit was stolen from the company's headquarters by a thief styling himself on the Cookie Monster. It was returned shortly afterwards.

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Labskaus is a typical north German dish and is today considered something of a speciality. Sailors on tall ships used to have no way of keeping food fresh for long. This stew made of cured beef, pickled beetroot, potato and onions could be kept for long periods, however. It's a dish that has given rise to numerous stories and legends. The world's largest labskaus festival takes place in the North See harbour town of Wilhelmshaven.

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Over 3,300 pubs, clubs and restaurants in Cologne will serve you a refreshing kölsch . This top-fermented beer is traditionally served in 0.2-litre glasses, or stangen , so the waiter, known locally as the köbes , is kept very busy if you're thirsty. It's a great way to experience Cologne hospitality. Just don't ask for a pils .

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