• Markthalle Neun
    Markthalle Neun ©visitBerlin/Philip Koschel
  • Pretzels from Baden-Württemberg
    Pretzels from Baden-Württemberg ©pixabay
  • Bavarian beer
    Bavarian beer ©BAYERN TOURISMUS Marketing GmbH
  • Dresden's Christstollen
    Dresden's Christstollen ©Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen (Sylvio Dittrich)
  • Lübeck marzipan
    Lübeck marzipan ©imago
  • Apfelwein from Hessen
    Apfelwein from Hessen ©Tourismus+Congress GmbH Frankfurt am Main
  • Halloren Kugeln from Saxony-Anhalt
    Halloren Kugeln from Saxony-Anhalt ©imago/Star-Media
  • Enjoying East Frisian tea at the harbour
    Enjoying East Frisian tea at the harbour ©Ostfriesland Tourismus GmbH
  • Up close with a herd of Heidschnucke sheep
    Up close with a herd of Heidschnucke sheep ©Lüneburger Heide GmbH
  • Fresh asparagus for sale in the Münsterland region
    Fresh asparagus for sale in the Münsterland region ©Oliver Franke, Tourismus NRW e.V.
  • Enjoying the local wine at a vintner's tavern in Baden-Württemberg
    Enjoying the local wine at a vintner's tavern in Baden-Württemberg ©TMBW
  • Eiergrog on Heligoland
    Eiergrog on Heligoland ©TASH/ I. Wandmacher
  • Fine wines at the vineyard
    Fine wines at the vineyard ©Rheinland-Pfalz Tourismus GmbH
  • Green sauce
    Green sauce ©Tourismus+Congress GmbH Frankfurt am Main

A taste of Germany.

Beer and bratwurst are of course an integral part of the country's festivals and public holidays. But they're just one small part of all the pleasures on offer. Take yourself on a culinary tour of discovery through Germany. You'll be amazed at the diversity of delicacies and taste experiences you'll encounter.

A cake that looks like a tree. Original Salzwedel baumkuchen (tree cake) is undoubtedly the Altmark region's most famous speciality. This delicacy has been baked for over 200 years. The cake is not cut into wedges like a torte, but served in small crescent-shaped slices. That way you can clearly see the 'tree rings' inside.

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Apfelwein , also known as stöffche or ebbelwei , is a type of cider that has long been considered the signature drink of the Hessen region. In and around Frankfurt in particular, you can find lots of inviting cider houses and beer gardens where apfelwein is served the old-fashioned way in a blue earthenware pitcher called a bembel . For a special treat, take a tour through Frankfurt on the Ebbelwei-Express, a sightseeing tram that has been transporting tourists and locals wanting to celebrate ever since 1977 – drink included.

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Düsseldorf is home to a great many traditional and inviting bars and restaurants, gourmet establishments and other foodie havens. Some of these are indisputably among the best in Germany. The overwhelming pull of the city's famous altbier lures visitors to the old quarter, where more than 260 bars and restaurants provide plenty of opportunity for sampling Düsseldorf's top-fermented beer.

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Ahle Wurscht ('old sausage') is a cured pork sausage matured over a long period and a traditional delicacy from the north of Hessen. The slow air-drying process lasting between three and twelve months gives the sausage its distinctive character. At the Ahle Wurscht Museum at the Landfleischerei Koch butchers in Kassel-Calden you can see some of the equipment used to make the sausages.

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Founded in 1924, Abtshof specialist distillery in Magdeburg is a long-established company. Today, it is best known for its Absinth 66 – a drink that enjoyed cult status on the French arts scene in the 1920s.

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For centuries, eels were the 'bread and butter fish' of freshwater fishermen in Lower Saxony. On the Weser, the Elbe, Lake Steinhude or Zwischenahn Lake, fishermen's livelihood depended on eels. Not only did they live on the sale of the freshly caught fish, they also refined the eel by smoking it, creating a delicacy famed throughout Germany. This has given rise to many regional recipes and traditions centred around this fish, which is rich in beneficial fats and other nutrients.

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Tales of emperors, an almighty blaze and even the devil surround this baked treat. One thing's for certain. Printen is a gingerbread that can be hard or soft depending on how much honey is in the recipe. Whatever the texture, it always tastes heavenly, especially when topped with nuts, almonds or cherries. Printen came into being when Napoleon cut mainland Europe off from imported sugar supplies. The bakers sweetened the dough with sugar beet syrup, giving Aachen Printen its distinctive flavour.

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