Seeing, hearing, feeling culture.

With 42 UNESCO World Heritage sites, architectural masterpieces from the Middle Ages to the Bauhaus, over 6,000 museums, hundreds of theatres and world famous orchestras and an agile, contemporary creative scene, Germany truly shines as a cultural destination of distinction. Our endeavour to make these treasures accessible to everyone is every bit as multi-layered as the tourist amenities themselves.
Cable car with Ehrenbreitstein Fortress in the background
Ehrenbreitstein Fortress, Koblenz

Today, anybody can conquer Ehrenbreitstein Fortress in Koblenz high above the confluence of the Rhine and Moselle — via the cable car with accessible gondolas or the inclined lift. To help you get your bearings when you arrive, you'll find ramps, a guide system for blind people and audio guides.

Exhibition room in Emden Art Gallery with paintings from the 20th century
Emden Kunsthalle art gallery

The nationally famous Emden Kunsthalle art gallery made its name with works of classical modernity and special exhibitions by famous artists. The attached school of painting undertakes projects for all age groups. Special tours are available for visitors with learning difficulties.

Museum guide using sign language in front of an exhibit of an astronaut's space suit
Federal Art Gallery in Bonn

The Art and Exhibition Hall of the Federal Republic of Germany in the City of Bonn, or the Federal Art Gallery for short, deals actively with themes of inclusion, a changing society and demographic shifts. In addition, assistance is currently being developed for visitors with special requirements.

The foyer of the Focke Museum in Bremen with archaeological stone statues and historical paintings
Focke Museum in Bremen

As the State Museum of Art and Cultural History, the Focke Museum in Bremen provides an extensive insight into the history of this Hanseatic city. All areas of the museum are extensively barrier-free. Audio guides are available for partially sighted visitors.

Group of visitors with walking canes and a tour guide at the Dialogue Museum in Frankfurt
Frankfurt Dialogue Museum

There's nothing to see in Frankfurt's Dialogue Museum. Guided by the blind members of the darkness team in six special experiential rooms, 'Dialogue in the Dark' lets visitors discover the invisible. The museum's surroundings take on a new character – puzzled, impressed and absorbed, sighted visitors learn to see things in a new light.

Friedrichstadt-Palast

Show entertainment with these unique dimensions cannot be found anywhere else in Europe but at the Friedrichstadt-Palast. The dimensions are huge: more than 100 artists on the world’s biggest theatre stage, a production budget of eleven million euros, the most lavish show in Europe. There are four wheelchair spaces and one induction loop in the Palast’s theater hall.

The annex with glass roof at the German Historical Museum with the Old Arsenal in the background
German Historical Museum in Berlin

Visitors to the German Historical Museum in Berlin come into physical contact with history. The exhibits are also explained acoustically or in sign language. Selected exhibits e.g. armour pieces, marble busts or a piece of the Berlin Wall, can be explored through touch.

Tactile sculpture of a hermaphrodite in the German Hygiene Museum in Dresden
German Hygiene Museum in Dresden

Visitors to Dresden's Hygiene Museum will discover the 'Abenteuer Mensch' (Adventurous Human). These spectacular exhibitions can be experienced by everyone thanks to tactile route finders, subtitled films, sign language tours, tactile objects and plain-language audio guides.

Barrier-free control

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