Seeing, hearing, feeling culture.

With 42 UNESCO World Heritage sites, architectural masterpieces from the Middle Ages to the Bauhaus, over 6,000 museums, hundreds of theatres and world famous orchestras and an agile, contemporary creative scene, Germany truly shines as a cultural destination of distinction. Our endeavour to make these treasures accessible to everyone is every bit as multi-layered as the tourist amenities themselves.
Blind and partially sighted children with building blocks at the German Museum of Technology
German Museum of Technology in Berlin

With its Science Center Spectrum, the German Technology Museum in Berlin is an interactive place of learning and experiences. A touchable mock-up of the entire facility is displayed in the fully accessible Infothek. Many of the exhibits include a description in Braille.

Exterior view of Hamburg Art Museum's elegant old brick building
Hamburg Kunsthalle art gallery

As one of Germany's most important art galleries, Hamburg's Kunsthalle houses masterpieces spanning 700 years of art history. All three buildings are fully accessible. Induction loop audio systems and guided tours in German sign language are available.

Exterior view of the Hamburg State Opera with its glass outer facade that gives a view of the opera visitors inside
Hamburg State Opera

The old-established Hamburg State Opera was founded as the first public opera house in 1678 and remains famous today for its gripping opera productions and ballet performances. There are two to four wheelchair berths at every performance, as well as designated car parking spaces.

Interior of St Michaelis Church with a view of the magnificent crypt and its numerous artefacts
Hauptkirche St Michaelis, Hamburg

St. Michaelis church is one of the most beautiful Baroque churches in northern Germany and its tower is Hamburg's most famous landmark. The entrance to the church and crypt of 'Michel' (the church's nickname) is suitable for wheelchair users. Special tours for blind and partially sighted visitors are provided, as are induction loop systems during services.

Exterior view of Jerichow Monastery
Jerichow Monastery

Thanks to extensive renovation works, the Romanesque Jerichow Monastery in the Old March (Altmark) region offers an almost entirely step free experience. The monastery's garden provides an experience for all the senses — smelling and tasting the herbs and medicinal plants is highly recommended.

Exterior view of Bremen Art Gallery with reflection on the lake in an evening setting
Kunsthalle art gallery in Bremen

The City of Bremen's Kunsthalle art gallery chiefly exhibits French and German art from the 19th and 20th centuries. All rooms have an entrance width of 1.3 metres and are fully accessible. Audio guides are provided; induction loop systems are available for hard of hearing visitors.

Cobblestone stretch of the Leipzig Note Trail
Leipzig's Notenspur

Leipzig's Notenspur (Note Trail) is a five-kilometre, visually signposted route through the city's town centre that connects the homes and workplaces of famous composers. The signs are visually highlighted; audio plays and musical extracts are also provided.

View from below of the Holsten Gate in Lübeck
Lübeck's historical old quarter

Founded in the 12th century, the town of Lübeck with its historical old quarter is today a UNESCO World Heritage site. Its romantic pathways and courtyards as well as a wealth of the old quarter's attractions can be discovered via accessible guided tours led by professional guides in 16 languages.

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