A taste of Germany.

Beer and bratwurst are of course an integral part of the country's festivals and public holidays. But they're just one small part of all the pleasures on offer. Take yourself on a culinary tour of discovery through Germany. You'll be amazed at the diversity of delicacies and taste experiences you'll encounter.

Though beer was not invented in Germany, the art of brewing was undoubtedly refined to perfection here. Germany is home to around 5,000 different beers brewed in more than 1,300 breweries, over half of which are in Bavaria. Nowhere else in the world offers as much choice when it comes to beer. And that's even with all varieties being produced in line with the German Beer Purity Law, which permits only the traditional ingredients of water, malt, hops and yeast. In summertime, the best way to enjoy a refreshingly cold beer is in one of the many beer gardens found up and down Germany.

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The Black Forest is home to the darkest, sweetest temptation in the whole of Germany. Whether it was first created in Radolfzell in 1915 or in a café in Tübingen in the 1930s, the Black Forest gateau definitely hails from Baden-Württemberg. And has gone on to conquer the world. Its key ingredients are Black Forest kirsch, which gives the cake its inimitable flavour, and of course cherries. As for how many cherries – that's up to the individual baker.

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The Bahlsen company in Hannover has been producing the famous Leibniz biscuit for over 120 years. Named after the renowned polymath Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, this extraordinary biscuit was even awarded a gold medal at the World's Fair in Chicago. So revered is it that in 2013 the brass emblem of the biscuit was stolen from the company's headquarters by a thief styling himself on the Cookie Monster. It was returned shortly afterwards.

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Coffee roasting is something of a tradition on the Weser river. The first coffee shop in the German-speaking countries opened here in the far north of the country in 1673. Since then, coffee has become a daily essential for practically everyone. And in Germany at least, there's every chance that your beans or ground coffee will have come through Bremen . Every other cup of coffee drunk between the North Sea and the Alps has its origins in Bremen. Decaff as well as regular, because thanks to the local coffee merchant Ludwig Roselius, the decaffeination process was invented on the banks of the Weser.

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The first frost of winter is something that the people of Lower Saxony actually look forward to. Because between the Elbe and Ems rivers, November to March is curly kale season. Kale and pinkel (a sausage made of bacon, pork belly, onions and herbs) is a regional dish of the north, and the leafy greens themselves are often enjoyed on 'kale tours' taken by groups of friends and colleagues.

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It's impossible to imagine the food scene in Berlin without the currywurst . For the most authentic experience, it's got to be Konnopke's Imbiss on Schönhauser Allee. Here, the five curry sauces range in spiciness from 'heavenly' (very mild) to 'hellish' (super hot) – just as they have done since 1930. If you want more than a quick taste of the cult fast food, head to the Currywurst Museum for entertaining insights into this humble sausage. From the sausage sofa through to a spice chamber with sniffing stations, it's all here. Visitors are encouraged to get hands on at this interactive exhibition.

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Dresden's Christstollen : a baking tradition preserved for centuries by the bakers and patissiers of Dresden. Though the basic ingredients of this traditional Christmas cake were laid down hundreds of years ago, every one of the 130 or so stollen bakeries and patisseries in Dresden has their own family recipe. Authentic Dresden Christstollen is only produced in Dresden and its suburbs and can be identified by its quality marque.

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To this day it remains customary to offer tea to visitors in East Friesland – always served with a piece of rock sugar and a spoonful of cream. Then all you need to drink it is a steady hand, because genuine East Frisian tea must be neither stirred, nor shaken. Only then can you appreciate all three stages of this teatime delight: mild and creamy to start, bitter in the middle with a sweet, sugary finish. For an introduction to the East Frisian tea ceremony, head to the Tea Museum in Norden or any of the charming little cafés along the coast.

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