A taste of Germany.

Beer and bratwurst are of course an integral part of the country's festivals and public holidays. But they're just one small part of all the pleasures on offer. Take yourself on a culinary tour of discovery through Germany. You'll be amazed at the diversity of delicacies and taste experiences you'll encounter.

Frankfurt 's best-known delicacy is the sausage named after the city. Today frankfurters are eaten and enjoyed all over the world. Traditionally made of pork, they get their unique taste from a special smoking process. Eaten in their home town since the 13th century, they are usually served in pairs with mustard or horseradish and accompanied by rye bread or potato salad.

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Traditionally containing seven herbs, Frankfurt's green sauce is served with boiled potatoes and hard-boiled eggs. It is usually served for the first time on Maundy Thursday, the day before Good Friday, and its season lasts until the first frost of autumn. Frankfurt even has a monument to the sauce, and every year in May the Green Sauce Festival takes place, where a prize is awarded for the best version.

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Fränkische schneeballen , or 'Franconian snowballs', are also referred to as stork nests. This ball-shaped pastry was once only baked for special occasions. These days they can be found all year round in most bakeries in and around Rothenburg ob der Tauber.

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The Münsterland is renowned for its wide range of places to eat, from country inns serving traditional dishes to Michelin-starred restaurants focused on regional produce. But come April, one dish is always on the menu: asparagus. And it generally remains there until June 24, Midsummer's Day, also known as Spargelsilvester ('Asparagus Eve'). Then its brief season is over and it's time to look forward to next year's crop. The best asparagus farms and farm shops can be found on the North Rhine-Westphalia Asparagus Route.

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With almost 2,000 kilometres of coastline and more than 2,000 lakes, fish is rarely off the menu in the restaurants of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania . Or try it fresh off the boat, or freshly smoked, in a fish roll, or even caught yourself. However you eat it, fish from the sea or lake is a healthy addition to your diet. Try it fried, smoked, pickled or baked in Bierteig , a beer-based pastry. At the height of the Hanseatic era, the herring was one of the most important trading commodities. The fish is still celebrated and eaten throughout the region today during the 'herring weeks' in spring.

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The Altes Land region is with good reason described as Germany's largest orchard. Just outside the city of Hamburg , more than 10,000 hectares are given over to fruit growing, predominantly apples, but also cherries, pears, plums and berries, all of which find their way into Germany's greengrocers. In Lower Saxony, this local fruit is mainly used in delicious cakes and other sweet treats, which can be sampled in numerous farmshop cafés out in the countryside.

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Part of the Saarland 's mining heritage is its fondness for traditional home-style cooking, especially potato-based dishes such as dumplings, which can be either meat-filled ( gefillde ) or plain ( hoorische ). And after you've eaten your full, a walk is always a good idea, perhaps on one of the various culinary-themed trails through the Saarland countryside.

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People have been enjoying fine wine in Bremen 's Ratskeller since 1409. It is the largest repository of German wines, with 650 exquisite varieties. This huge vaulted hall with its columns and ornate wine barrels has welcomed plenty of famous characters, including the poet Heinrich Heine, who was inspired to put his experience into verse.

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