• Enjoying East Frisian tea at the harbour
    Enjoying East Frisian tea at the harbour ©Ostfriesland Tourismus GmbH
  • Eiergrog on Heligoland
    Eiergrog on Heligoland ©TASH/ I. Wandmacher
  • Pretzels from Baden-Württemberg
    Pretzels from Baden-Württemberg ©pixabay
  • Halloren Kugeln from Saxony-Anhalt
    Halloren Kugeln from Saxony-Anhalt ©imago/Star-Media
  • Bavarian beer
    Bavarian beer ©BAYERN TOURISMUS Marketing GmbH
  • Markthalle Neun
    Markthalle Neun ©visitBerlin/Philip Koschel
  • Lübeck marzipan
    Lübeck marzipan ©imago
  • Apfelwein from Hessen
    Apfelwein from Hessen ©Tourismus+Congress GmbH Frankfurt am Main
  • Dresden's Christstollen
    Dresden's Christstollen ©Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen (Sylvio Dittrich)
  • Up close with a herd of Heidschnucke sheep
    Up close with a herd of Heidschnucke sheep ©Lüneburger Heide GmbH
  • Enjoying the local wine at a vintner's tavern in Baden-Württemberg
    Enjoying the local wine at a vintner's tavern in Baden-Württemberg ©TMBW
  • Fine wines at the vineyard
    Fine wines at the vineyard ©Rheinland-Pfalz Tourismus GmbH
  • Fresh asparagus for sale in the Münsterland region
    Fresh asparagus for sale in the Münsterland region ©Oliver Franke, Tourismus NRW e.V.
  • Green sauce
    Green sauce ©Tourismus+Congress GmbH Frankfurt am Main

A taste of Germany.

Beer and bratwurst are of course an integral part of the country's festivals and public holidays. But they're just one small part of all the pleasures on offer. Take yourself on a culinary tour of discovery through Germany. You'll be amazed at the diversity of delicacies and taste experiences you'll encounter.

Traditionally containing seven herbs, Frankfurt's green sauce is served with boiled potatoes and hard-boiled eggs. It is usually served for the first time on Maundy Thursday, the day before Good Friday, and its season lasts until the first frost of autumn. Frankfurt even has a monument to the sauce, and every year in May the Green Sauce Festival takes place, where a prize is awarded for the best version.

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Alex Kühn needs chocolate weather. Only then do the creations of the Goldhelm chocolate maker in Erfurt taste their best. And there are plenty of varieties to choose from: chocolate with ginger, chilli, candied orange, cranberries, whisky or green tea. Be sure to try one of the brückentrüffel (bridge truffles) – the Goldhelm shop is located on Erfurt's most famous landmark, the Merchants' Bridge ( Krämerbrücke ).

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Part of the Saarland 's mining heritage is its fondness for traditional home-style cooking, especially potato-based dishes such as dumplings, which can be either meat-filled ( gefillde ) or plain ( hoorische ). And after you've eaten your full, a walk is always a good idea, perhaps on one of the various culinary-themed trails through the Saarland countryside.

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Fränkische schneeballen , or 'Franconian snowballs', are also referred to as stork nests. This ball-shaped pastry was once only baked for special occasions. These days they can be found all year round in most bakeries in and around Rothenburg ob der Tauber.

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Frankfurt 's best-known delicacy is the sausage named after the city. Today frankfurters are eaten and enjoyed all over the world. Traditionally made of pork, they get their unique taste from a special smoking process. Eaten in their home town since the 13th century, they are usually served in pairs with mustard or horseradish and accompanied by rye bread or potato salad.

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The Frankfurter Kranz cake is a ring-shaped cake made from several layers of sponge and covered in buttercream. It symbolises Frankfurt 's former status as a 'coronation city'. Its shape, golden brittle coating and ruby-red glacé cherries all combine to suggest a kaiser's crown. First mentioned in 1735, even today it's a treat that is frequently enjoyed with afternoon coffee.

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With almost 2,000 kilometres of coastline and more than 2,000 lakes, fish is rarely off the menu in the restaurants of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania . Or try it fresh off the boat, or freshly smoked, in a fish roll, or even caught yourself. However you eat it, fish from the sea or lake is a healthy addition to your diet. Try it fried, smoked, pickled or baked in Bierteig , a beer-based pastry. At the height of the Hanseatic era, the herring was one of the most important trading commodities. The fish is still celebrated and eaten throughout the region today during the 'herring weeks' in spring.

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The banter of the fish sellers entertains the crowds. Fish rolls and rollmops are sold in their thousands, and fruit, vegetables and plants can be had at bargain prices. Even live rabbits and bric-a-brac are on sale. The Hamburg fish market on the banks of the Elbe attracts early risers and night owls every Sunday from 6 to 9.30am. It may not be the world's oldest fish market. But it's probably the liveliest.

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