• Green sauce
    Green sauce ©Tourismus+Congress GmbH Frankfurt am Main
  • Halloren Kugeln from Saxony-Anhalt
    Halloren Kugeln from Saxony-Anhalt ©imago/Star-Media
  • Fresh asparagus for sale in the Münsterland region
    Fresh asparagus for sale in the Münsterland region ©Oliver Franke, Tourismus NRW e.V.
  • Bavarian beer
    Bavarian beer ©BAYERN TOURISMUS Marketing GmbH
  • Dresden's Christstollen
    Dresden's Christstollen ©Tourismus Marketing Gesellschaft Sachsen (Sylvio Dittrich)
  • Lübeck marzipan
    Lübeck marzipan ©imago
  • Pretzels from Baden-Württemberg
    Pretzels from Baden-Württemberg ©pixabay
  • Up close with a herd of Heidschnucke sheep
    Up close with a herd of Heidschnucke sheep ©Lüneburger Heide GmbH
  • Apfelwein from Hessen
    Apfelwein from Hessen ©Tourismus+Congress GmbH Frankfurt am Main
  • Enjoying East Frisian tea at the harbour
    Enjoying East Frisian tea at the harbour ©Ostfriesland Tourismus GmbH
  • Eiergrog on Heligoland
    Eiergrog on Heligoland ©TASH/ I. Wandmacher
  • Markthalle Neun
    Markthalle Neun ©visitBerlin/Philip Koschel
  • Enjoying the local wine at a vintner's tavern in Baden-Württemberg
    Enjoying the local wine at a vintner's tavern in Baden-Württemberg ©TMBW
  • Fine wines at the vineyard
    Fine wines at the vineyard ©Rheinland-Pfalz Tourismus GmbH

A taste of Germany.

Beer and bratwurst are of course an integral part of the country's festivals and public holidays. But they're just one small part of all the pleasures on offer. Take yourself on a culinary tour of discovery through Germany. You'll be amazed at the diversity of delicacies and taste experiences you'll encounter.

Once the signature drink of the Frisians, pharisäer is now enjoyed right across Schleswig-Holstein. This hot coffee mixed with rum and sugar and topped with whipped cream is just the answer on a cold day. It originated from the North Sea island of Nordstrand in the mid-19th century. Just as popular, if not more so, is Heligoland's eiergrog , a hot drink of egg yolk, sugar, rum and water. While some warn it will knock the socks off even the strongest mariner, others think it's simply delicious. Either way, raise your glasses and say prost !

More »

Dresden's Christstollen : a baking tradition preserved for centuries by the bakers and patissiers of Dresden. Though the basic ingredients of this traditional Christmas cake were laid down hundreds of years ago, every one of the 130 or so stollen bakeries and patisseries in Dresden has their own family recipe. Authentic Dresden Christstollen is only produced in Dresden and its suburbs and can be identified by its quality marque.

More »

Berliners have many regular habits – but nothing beats the doner kebab. The very best vegetarian doners are served at Mustafas Gemüse Kebap kiosk. Or if you don't fancy a kebab, Curry 36 serves currywurst nearby – so nearby in fact that the queues for the two takeaways sometimes get tangled up.

More »

People have been enjoying fine wine in Bremen 's Ratskeller since 1409. It is the largest repository of German wines, with 650 exquisite varieties. This huge vaulted hall with its columns and ornate wine barrels has welcomed plenty of famous characters, including the poet Heinrich Heine, who was inspired to put his experience into verse.

More »

It's impossible to imagine the food scene in Berlin without the currywurst . For the most authentic experience, it's got to be Konnopke's Imbiss on Schönhauser Allee. Here, the five curry sauces range in spiciness from 'heavenly' (very mild) to 'hellish' (super hot) – just as they have done since 1930. If you want more than a quick taste of the cult fast food, head to the Currywurst Museum for entertaining insights into this humble sausage. From the sausage sofa through to a spice chamber with sniffing stations, it's all here. Visitors are encouraged to get hands on at this interactive exhibition.

More »

Almost as much as bread, the pretzel (or brezel ) embodies the very essence of German baking. Many myths surround its origins. One legend has it that the Swabian pretzel was invented over 500 years ago in Bad Urach on the edge of the Swabian Alb. The baker at the ducal residence there had fallen from grace and was awaiting his execution. The duke granted him one last chance, promising to spare his life if he baked a bread through which the sun could shine three times. The baker escaped death by producing the pretzel. Find out more at the Museum of Bread Culture in Ulm.

More »

Though beer was not invented in Germany, the art of brewing was undoubtedly refined to perfection here. Germany is home to around 5,000 different beers brewed in more than 1,300 breweries, over half of which are in Bavaria. Nowhere else in the world offers as much choice when it comes to beer. And that's even with all varieties being produced in line with the German Beer Purity Law, which permits only the traditional ingredients of water, malt, hops and yeast. In summertime, the best way to enjoy a refreshingly cold beer is in one of the many beer gardens found up and down Germany.

More »

Temporary taverns spring up all over the winegrowing regions as soon as the first glass of wine is poured. Winegrowers in Baden-Württemberg open up bars in their vineyards but only for a few weeks in the year. Many of these are simple set-ups in barns, cellars or garages. Old-fashioned broomsticks are decorated and hung outside the main building as a sign that the season has begun and visitors are welcome to stop for a drink. In the Württemberg region, these vintner taverns are called besenwirtschaften (broom inns) or besa . Baden's wineries call them straussen or straussis . Whatever you call them, their atmosphere is hard to beat!

More »

Engelsiz kullanım

Tarayıcıda zoom yapmak için iki faydalı tuş kombinasyonu:

Büyütme: +

Küçültme: +

Daha fazla yardım için aşağıdaki simgeye tıklayarak sağlayıcınızla bağlantı kurun: